Making an outdoor bread table

I have wanted to build an outdoor bread table for my on-going outdoor kitchen project. I had a large stone for the top. It’s been around a fire pit for years. But I thought it would make a perfect top to a table. It’s heavy, it’s flat and it will put up with the Vermont outdoors without getting ruined. So finally I dedicated some time to figuring out what to use for a bottom to the table. I have a 150+ year-old sugar maple tree I cut down a few years back that I’ve been sawing pieces off for projects. Looking at it the other day, I decided a chunk of that old tree can be a pedestal for my table. The dimensions were right, and it’s certainly heavy enough to hold the 200 pound stone.

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First, the tool. My chainsaw with a 42″ bar. This bar about doubles the weight of my saw, and it’s a bear to use. But when you’re cutting a 40″ hard maple tree, it comes in handy.

 

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This is the small end of the tree. The base is about 44 inches. Here at 10 feet up from the bottom of the tree, it’s still at two feet.

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The setup. The pedestal is in place. I dragged this over with my log skidder, aka my 2001 Saab 9-5 station wagon. As you can see, my 42″ chainsaw bar throws a lot of wood chips.

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The stone is in place. This I dragged over with my garden tractor. I laid it on a sheet of plywood with holes in it to accept a logging chain. It dragged as smooth as silk. I’m saving that piece of plywood for other projects.

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A shot of the placement of the table. My pizza oven is 15 feet to the left.

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A friend came over, ironically enough so I could work on his chainsaw, and he helped me hoist the tabletop into place.

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After scrubbing my stone with an electric drill with a wire brush on it and a stiff plastic brush and soapy water, my tabletop came pretty clean. Now you can see the striations in the stone. I’m not sue what kind of stone it is. Any ideas from any geologists out there?

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After a day of fooling around with this project, my table is complete. Now I’m just waiting for a warm day to put it into operation.

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